Click here to add text.
Click here to add text.Exhibition Proposal:  Two from Tucson
A Study in Methodology and Thematics
“Sanctuary”
Purpose 

Kyle Johnston and Marc David Leviton are two Tucsonan artists who have worked both separately and collaboratively.  When combined, their careers span nearly four decades. This exhibition will bring together both artists’ work in scholarly review.  The audience will have the opportunity to assess equally the artists’ work that each has produced both individually and collaboratively.

Kyle Johnston

Johnston’s outsider, resonant and complex assemblages of desiccated wooden boxes, worn figurines and various found objects and his elaborate collages produced from salvaging text and illustrations of old discarded books, magazines, and newspapers, draws inspiration from the styling of the California Funk Art Movement and the tenets of Dadaism. 

The art presents a capricious nature that combines a dichotomy of classical, religious, and contemporary iconography into vignettes, which the viewing audience can experience via a haunting sense of mystery or vestiges of thought and process that evoke emotion and memories both inaccessible and recognizable.  

A mixture of technical techniques such as painting, assembling, collage, and antiquing the unpredictable surfaces gives the artwork an appearance of misused, forgotten, attic, or discarded.

Marc David Leviton
Leviton appropriates classic and well-known works of art, as well as religious and mythological themes, and then reformats them into a modern context via materials and installation.  His art reflects a scholarly passion for classical and contemporary figurative sculpture and religious, political, and personal themes. 

Working in found object assemblages combined with life casting, latex, plaster, foundry, fabrication, and kinetics, the sculptures narration is human anguish based on governing bodies and belief systems.  Making the sculptures kinetic adds the attraction of a pseudo living force and invites both visual and sometimes physical participation.

On the psychological side of Leviton’s examinations he seeks both the disturbing and the comically ironic end of what is the human condition.  He produces a macabre mix of flayed skins, body parts, mechanical devises that deliver the viewer to contemplate their bodies and those of their neighbors-- what one can accept and what one cannot; what is an affront and what is open to examination.

Collaborative Work 

The result of this combination is a collective dialogue that encapsulates Johnston and Leviton in a measured mixture of applied individual aesthetics and sensibilities that provides a provocative lexicon of complicated—and sometimes distorted or confounding-- imagery through allegory and metaphor.

Click here to add                        Exhibition Proposal:  Two from Tucson
                                               A Study in Methodology and Thematics
                                                                 “Sanctuary”
Purpose 

Kyle Johnston and Marc David Leviton are two Tucsonan artists who have worked both separately and collaboratively.  When combined, their careers span nearly four decades. This exhibition will bring together both artists’ work in scholarly review.  The audience will have the opportunity to assess equally the artists’ work that each has produced both individually and collaboratively.

Kyle Johnston

Johnston’s outsider, resonant and complex assemblages of desiccated wooden boxes, worn figurines and various found objects and his elaborate collages produced from salvaging text and illustrations of old discarded books, magazines, and newspapers, draws inspiration from the styling of the California Funk Art Movement and the tenets of Dadaism. 

The art presents a capricious nature that combines a dichotomy of classical, religious, and contemporary iconography into vignettes, which the viewing audience can experience via a haunting sense of mystery or vestiges of thought and process that evoke emotion and memories both inaccessible and recognizable.  

A mixture of technical techniques such as painting, assembling, collage, and antiquing the unpredictable surfaces gives the artwork an appearance of misused, forgotten, attic, or discarded.

Marc David Leviton

Leviton appropriates classic and well-known works of art, as well as religious and mythological themes, and then reformats them into a modern context via materials and installation.  His art reflects a scholarly passion for classical and contemporary figurative sculpture and religious, political, and personal themes. 

Working in found object assemblages combined with life casting, latex, plaster, foundry, fabrication, and kinetics, the sculptures narration is human anguish based on governing bodies and belief systems.  Making the sculptures kinetic adds the attraction of a pseudo living force and invites both visual and sometimes physical participation.

On the psychological side of Leviton’s examinations he seeks both the disturbing and the comically ironic end of what is the human condition.  He produces a macabre mix of flayed skins, body parts, mechanical devises that deliver the viewer to contemplate their bodies and those of their neighbors-- what one can accept and what one cannot; what is an affront and what is open to examination.

Collaborative Work 

The result of this combination is a collective dialogue that encapsulates Johnston and Leviton in a measured mixture of applied individual aesthetics and sensibilities that provides a provocative lexicon of complicated—and sometimes distorted or confounding-- imagery through allegory and metaphor.
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